How to Make Your Patient Happy

 

I’ve been a people pleaser for a long time now. I’m not entirely sure when it all started. I distinctly remember being an annoying, pain in butt kid and teenager.

Whenever it began, it is a large part of the adult me. In my yearbook I was noted at “best known” for my “perkiness”. Without analyzing why I feel the need to make people happy ( I will do that in a later post) I have to admit that I really, really enjoy it.

I currently work in home care. My patients range from basically healthy in need of companionship to end of life hospice. I feel responsible for the happiness of my patients and their families. I accept this responsibility with…

…happiness (of course).

  1. Call ahead- I always give a one hour window for my visit. I always call if I’m running early or late. I also ask if there is anything they need while I’m “out”. The patient often asks me to stop and pick something up for them. I’m happy to help.
  2. Arrive on time-See above.I am very careful about predicting the time of my arrival. Even if they patient is a little old lady who sits in her chair all day, she appreciates knowing what time to expect me.
  3. Listen-For real. I can’t just pretend to listen. When they talk about their hobbies or their kids or whatever, I listen. The next time I speak to them I will reference our previous conversation. They love that. They know I was really listening.
  4. Smile-A genuine smile can be hard if I’m not really happy. That’s ok. I’m practically always happy.
  5. Laugh-When I laugh with my patient, or make them laugh, its like a gold star that I earned.
  6. Ask good questions-It is so important to ask the right questions. I have learned to stop asking “How are you?” because I have received the response “How do you think I am?” one too many times. now I ask, “What’s new?”. To gather accurate information about the patients health and state of mind I have to ask smart questions. “Are you having any pain?” is just not enough. I also ask about discomfort and weakness. Then I ALSO ask about specific types of pain; back, knee, joint, etc. I know that a lot of patients don’t want to “complain” but I beg them to be honest with me.
  7. Give good answers-The answers are as important as the questions. The most important is when I don’t have the answer. If I really don’t have an immediate solution I promise to follow up, and then I do.
  8. Follow up-See above. Follow up is annoying for me, but I know how important it is for my patients. They are so happy when I get results and report back to them. Almost like they’re surprised that I actually did what I said I would do.
  9. Anticipate outcomes-This is where we use our crystal ball that is really our clinical experience, to predict the future. That is what I have to do every day, every minute.
  10. Remember the childrens’ names
  11. Remember the grandchildrens’ names
  12. Remember the pets’ names-I write them down in the patient’s paperwork. Yes, it is that important.
  13. Notice what is hanging on the walls-So much of what I want to know is hanging on my the walls. Are they a veteran? Are they married? Do they have children? Are the paintings on the wall all painted by the same artist? This is something that I actually look for. If so, I ask about the artist, which is usually the patient themself, or a family member.
  14. Do the laundry-How difficult is it to throw in a load of laundry? Even offering is a truly appreciated gesture.
  15. Wash the dishes-See above.
  16. Ask about hobbies and interests-My patients tell me about the most interesting hobbies; breeding horses (see previous post), keeping bees (stay tuned for this post), needlepoint, painting, gardening… 
  17. Take good notes-I take notes about everything. Sometimes the minute details are necessary to reference later. A seemingly unimportant statement or issue can become significant later.
  18. Bring gloves-You can never have too many boxes of gloves. This makes the patient and the caregiver very happy.
  19. Respect them-I am an invited guest in the patients home. I offer to take off my shoes, I ask permission before I sit. My patient is the boss. They deserve respect.
  20. Don’t argue-There is no situation I can think of where this would be appropriate or acceptable. Just don’t do it.

 

Lessons I’ve Learned:

  1. Its the details that count.
  2. Never underestimate your ability to change someone’s day. 
  3. Be present-whatever is going on in your life doesn’t matter when you’re with a patient.